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Title 1 Program

Title I is the largest federal aid program for elementary and secondary schools. It was originally enacted in 1965 as the cornerstone of President Lyndon Johnson’s war on Poverty. School districts receive federal funds through a multi-step allocation process. In turn, they distribute the funds to schools in their jurisdiction with above average percentages of low income children.
The federal grants are allocated according to a legislative formula based mainly on the distribution of low income children and state per pupil expenditures. While the monies allocated to Title I are based on poverty, enrollment of children in programs is based on their need for supplemental educational services, without regard to their family income.
The federal programs budget is created annually. If schools do not qualify for Title services under the average poverty formula, a waiver may be submitted to the state for approval.
The school district must identify annually their program eligible schools or apply for a waiver for poverty. The basic eligibility rule is that a school attendance area is eligible if the students residing in the area include a percentage of low-income children at least equal to the local education agency (LEA) average. Children are identified based on free or reduced lunches.
Districts are permitted to examine the percentage of low-income students actually enrolled in a given school to determine that schools eligibility. Under one of the guidelines a school that is not eligible based on percentage of low income may become eligible if the percentage of low income children actually enrolled in the school is at least as high as the average for all participating school attendance areas. Another rule specifies that if a school attendance area or school has at least 35% poverty it may be eligible. Therefore schools are ranked by their percentage of poverty with enrollment numbers also included in the selection of schools.
Parents are encouraged to become a part of the Title I program through parental involvement activities and the parent advisory council.

 

“Assessment Requirements”

Title I programs must report each individual Title I student’s progress. Title I teachers monitor progress of Title I students in all of the grades served. A review of each Title I students’ progress is conducted to determine gains. A minimum of three assessment criteria are used to measure student progress.
Title I programs are required to provide parents with the assessment results in a written format. This written format is entitled “Title I Progress Report”.
Assessments must:
  • Be used to record the progress of all Title I students
  • May include objective and subjective criteria. The Juniata County School District has elected to use objective criteria
  • Be reported to parents 3 times a year for DIBELS and each marking period for other assessments
  • Be developmentally appropriate
  • Maintained in a file for each Title I student
Title I teachers are encouraged to keep a portfolio of Title I students progress which can include the assessment data.

 

“District Parent Involvement Policy”

The linked document will explain the Title 1 Involvement Policy within the Juniata County School District.

Title I Parent Involvement Policy

 

“ESL 5 Year Comparison Proficiency Results”

The attached spreadsheet shows a 5 year comparison of results for the English Proficiency Testing in the Juniata County School District.It shows the 5 levels of student proficiency of:
  • Entering
  • Beginning
  • Developing
  • Expanding
  • Bridging
  • Reaching

 

“Exit Criteria”

Each Title I students’ progress should be reviewed quarterly in alignment with the 4 marking periods.
Exiting for Title I students will be based upon meeting the multiple criterion which will include:
  • Moved up 1 level in DIBELS (i.e. from strategic to benchmark )
  • AIMS web/other progress monitoring consistently increasing (3 or more points)
  • Improved at least one grade in title area of weakness (i.e. C – & B in reading)
If all three criterion are met, then student may be dismissed from Title services

 

 “Language Arts Eligibility”

Title I Language Arts Eligibility Through a careful analysis of academic performance,a child may benefit from supplemental instruction in language arts skills. The Juniata County School District is able to offer such supplemental help in this critical area through the federally-funded Title I program. A child can be enrolled in the program to receive supplemental language arts instruction during the current school year.
Qualification for Title I services requires the use of many assessments. The following assessments are used to determine eligibility:
  • DIBELS scores (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills)
  • Terra Nova scores (1st and 2nd grades) or 4-Sight & PSSA (3-5 grade)
  • Classroom grades
  • Teacher recommendation

 

“Mathematics Eligibility”

Through a careful analysis of academic performance a child may benefit from supplemental instruction in math skills. The Juniata County School District is able to offer such supplemental help in this critical area through the federally-funded Title I program. A child can be enrolled in the program to receive supplemental mathematics instruction during the current school year.
Qualification for Title I mathematics services requires the use of many assessments. The following assessments are used:
  • Terra Nova scores (1st and 2nd grades) or 4-Sight & PSSA (3 grade)
  • Classroom grades
  • Teacher recommendation
*Math will not be offered as part of the Title I public school program but is being provided to the non-public schools funded through this grant for the 2011-12 school year.

 

“Terms & Definitions”

USED IN SCHOOLS
The purpose of this document is to provide you with a reference to key terms and/definitions that you may have heard or may hear in your child’s school.
  • AYP-Adequate Yearly Progress; the federal measure used to hold schools, districts and states accountable for student progress.
  • Benchmark-detailed description of student performance expected of students at particular ages, grades or developmental levels. The term “benchmark” is heard frequently in DIBELS testing
  • DIBELS– Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills has been researched to be a reliable indicator of early literacy development and a tool to identify students who are not progressing as expected. DIBELS scores are used to identify students who need more intensive, differentiated instruction. Students in kindergarten through grade 5 are administered DIBELS three times per year (fall, winter, and spring).
  • ED-economically disadvantaged; one of the subgroups measured through AYP. Students in this subgroup are identified through receiving free and reduced lunches
  • ELL-English Language Learners; term used to refer to non-native English speakers who are receiving ESL classes
  • ESL-English as a Second Language; classes provided to students identified as ELL
  • FR-free and reduced lunches
  • Graduation Rate-used at second indicator for AYP for high schools
  • IST-Instructional Support Teacher; works with team in school to identify needed interventions and to implement interventions for struggling students prior to being referred for an evaluation.
  • IEP-Individualized Education Program; written document which is developed for each eligible student with a disability in accordance with the requirements of the Federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
  • LEA-local education agency
  • No Child Left Behind Act of 2001-federal law that authorized funding and contains current requirements for Title I and other federal educational programs. It was written to help close the achievement gap between disadvantaged and minority students and their peers.
  • Smart Board- interactive whiteboard that helps to energize presentations and motivate learners. It engages students by combining the white board with a computer